Artfelt

Artfelt

Artfelt – The Children’s Hospital Charity’s arts programme – is an ongoing project that creates colourful and engaging art in Sheffield Children's Hospital, by brightening the walls, making our children smile and engaging them in creative workshops - whether they are here long term or just for a few hours.

Our surroundings have a powerful effect on how we feel, and that’s especially important in a hospital, where the environment can influence wellbeing and comfort for our patients, visitors and staff. We always need funding to continue this invaluable work for our patients.

Find out more in our Artfelt section.

Giggle Doctors

Giggle Doctors

Our Giggle Doctors bring fun, magic and smiles to the wards of Sheffield Children's Hospital, proving that laughter really is the best medicine. Donning colourfully decorated white coats, unusual hair styles and plenty of sparkle, the doctors engage the many children who pass through the hospital doors each day in fun and games, sing-alongs, balloon making and more - to help take patient’s minds off their treatment.

Two-year-old Zak, from Hull, had a surprise visit from the Giggle Doctors following a procedure to treat his digestion problems. Zak was mesmerised by the bubbles and bright colours that Dr Princezz brought to his bedside. But we need your help to keep bringing the Giggle Doctors to our wards. 

Monitoring brain activity in premature babies

Monitoring brain activity in premature babies

In 2017/18 we're funding a study to monitor brain activity in premature babies.

Pre-term infants are some of the sickest in our hospital and are often cared for in the intensive care unit. While in ICU, babies are constantly monitored for changes in heart rate, oxygen levels, blood pressure and breathing patterns.

Yet brain function is not monitored at all. This is despite brain injury being common, which can lead to development and learning difficulties and is a frequent cause of cerebral palsy.

The amplitude integrated encephalography (aEEG) monitor measures brain activity by attaching leads to a baby’s head. 

The study will potentially improve the treatment and information families receive on their child’s future health.

Using 3D animation and models to treat fetal CDH

Using 3D animation and models to treat fetal CDH

In 2017/18 we funded a project which uses 3D animation and models to better diagnose Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) during pregnancy.

CDH occurs when there is a hole in the muscle that separates the chest from the abdomen. This means the bowel and other organs enter the chest and squash the developing lungs.

This project would use normal images a mother has during her pregnancy and make 3D animations and models of the baby and the CDH.

This well help our hospital surgeons, who will operate on the baby once it is born, see the size of the hole and the displaced organs. They can then choose the best type of operation and the best piece of material to patch the hole.

This means affected babies will have the best care and quickest recovery possible, all arranged before leaving the womb!

Monitoring Activity with Type 1 Diabetes

Monitoring Activity with Type 1 Diabetes

In 2017/18 we funded research exploring the link between physical activity and daily blood glucose levels in children with Type 1 Diabetes.

The unpredictable nature of children’s everyday activities causes fluctuations in blood glucose levels, which can cause a range of chronic complications for parents managing their child’s diabetes.

This research will explore the perceptions of parents, children and healthcare providers in monitoring physical activity and daily blood glucose levels.

Diagnosing Vitamin D Deficiency

Diagnosing Vitamin D Deficiency

In the community, GPs may send a referral for Vitamin D analysis if patients present with symptoms such as constant tiredness, skin complaints, bone pain and muscle weakness. 

While the impact of vitamin D levels on bone health has long been known, the effects on other conditions have only more recently been explored.

These include dermatological conditions, mental health, allergies, gastroenterological health and cardiac disorder. 

In 2017/18, we funded a machine called a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometer, which is considered the gold standard for diagnosing vitamin D deficiency. 

Early identification can prevent conditions like rickets going undiagnosed, preventing the potential for lifelong disability and musculoskeletal problems.

Diagnosing sleep-related breathing disorders

Diagnosing sleep-related breathing disorders

In 2017/18 we funded a research project called ThermPaed which aims to develop High Resolution Thermal Imaging as a noncontact, child-friendly means of measuring and monitoring airflow.

6% of children aged 1-3 have pauses in their breathing during sleep called apnoeas. The condition needs accurate diagnosis to ensure correct blood oxygen levels.

Currently, breathing is measured by two sensors placed in or very close to the nostril to detect apnoea. Due to their contact nature, they often cause discomfort.

In a recent survey of 100 sleep studies in our sleep unit, 50% of children did not allow the sensors to be attached or removed them, making their condition difficult to diagnose.

This funding will ensure a more accurate, child-friendly diagnosis of sleep-related breathing disorders.

SPECT CT Scanner

SPECT CT Scanner

In 2017/18, we funded an £800,000 SPECT CT scanner which incorporates nuclear medicine gamma scanning (SPECT) with an inbuilt CT scanning function. 

This means images can be taken in two planes so radiologists can get the benefit of gamma and CT scanning in one session.

Improved diagnostic confidence means faster access to tailored treatments for the 26 areas that require gamma scanning each year.

For children with cancer, this means they may avoid unnecessary medicines and therapies that can leave them feeling extremely unwell.

Research

Research

We fund pioneering research to make it better

As part of The Children’s Hospital Charity’s mission to make it better, we fund vital research which the NHS does not cover – helping to provide the very best healthcare for children.

With the help of charitable donations we were able to open a brand new Clinical Research Facility – the first of its kind in the UK. The facility is key to bringing together doctors, nurses, students and other health professionals together to develop pioneering work in a range of areas such as bone disease, genetics and cancer.

We have committed to fund over £250,000 research every year to ensure future generations receive the very best health care – through better treatment, better diagnosis and better treatment.

EOS X-ray system

EOS X-ray system

In 2017/18, we funded the EOS scanner which is an ultra-low dose 2D and 3D digital X-ray system.

Based on a Nobel Prize-winning invention, the system allows sitting and weight-bearing images of the entire body, including importantly the lower limbs and the spine. 

It imparts an extremely low radiation dose, making it suitable for multiple scans even in very small children. 

It also provides 2D and 3D images and allows rapid in-built calculation of many length and angular abnormalities.

Although it is based in the Children’s Hospital, both children and adults can access the specialists’ piece of equipment, significantly broadening the scope of musculoskeletal research in Sheffield.

Burns Club

Burns Club

Theo’s Burns Club was set up through our charity to help youngsters treated on the Burns Unit at Sheffield Children's Hospital. As well as funding equipment such as a thermally controlled bath and pain distraction units, donations made to the club help pay for days out and camps for children coming to terms with their injuries. Julie Baker, ward manager, said: “It is to get families supporting each other. We all go over together and then we introduce different families to each other – to someone who knows what they are going through, because no one else can know. We get them to talk through all of their experiences, and it helps them deal with the emotions surrounding the burns.”

Patient entertainment systems

Patient entertainment systems

On surveying parents and patients, 73% wanted a Bedhead TV with the option to use a mobile device with WiFi.

The cost of each system is around £3,000 and the charity has provided funding for the units in the new wing of the hospital.

The project will be extended to fund systems in the remaining wards, meaning each child can choose their own entertainment during their stay in our hospital.

Equipment

Equipment

Every year we fund life-saving equipment to keep Sheffield Children's Hospital at the forefront of paediatric care. Thanks to the generosity of our supporters we can keep our hospital’s specialist services special, by providing equipment that goes over and above the NHS provision. Over the years, The Children’s Hospital Charity has donated millions of pounds worth of ground-breaking medical kit and machinery to ensure every child we treat receives the best possible care. But we will never stop wanting better for our children, so we will never stop needing your help.

Examining outcomes and readiness in uveitis

Examining outcomes and readiness in uveitis

Uveitis is the chronic inflammation of the eye which can lead to damage and blindness if untreated. It frequently occurs in children with juvenile arthritis and often does not cause any symptoms in the early stages.

Studies examining psychosocial outcomes, from anxiety to health-related quality of life in adolescents and young adults with uveitis are scarce, even though it could have a huge impact on the transition to adult health services.

This survey will examine the relationship between anxiety and transition readiness in 35 uveitis patients aged between 10-25 years old.

Its findings will help better understand which factors influence a child's transition to adult services and improve the targeting of psychological interventions.

Play specialists

Play specialists

At Sheffield Children's Hospital, a team of play specialists work hard to help make hospital stays that bit easier for our young patients. 

They work to provide entertainment, fun and distraction for children of all ages - taking their minds of painful treatments and breaking up long stays on the wards.

Our charity helps make their job easier, by funding craft materials, toys and games to ensure our children can play and take part in activities while in hospital. Each year, we need to raise £5,000 to donate to the team so they can continue doing their amazing work as well as £3,000 in December, so each child who is on a ward during Christmas is made to feel special.