Artfelt

Artfelt

Artfelt – The Children’s Hospital Charity’s arts programme – is an ongoing project that creates colourful and engaging art in Sheffield Children's Hospital, by brightening the walls, making our children smile and engaging them in creative workshops - whether they are here long term or just for a few hours.

Our surroundings have a powerful effect on how we feel, and that’s especially important in a hospital, where the environment can influence wellbeing and comfort for our patients, visitors and staff. We always need funding to continue this invaluable work for our patients.

Find out more in our Artfelt section.

Giggle Doctors

Giggle Doctors

Our Giggle Doctors bring fun, magic and smiles to the wards of Sheffield Children's Hospital, proving that laughter really is the best medicine. Donning colourfully decorated white coats, unusual hair styles and plenty of sparkle, the doctors engage the many children who pass through the hospital doors each day in fun and games, sing-alongs, balloon making and more - to help take patient’s minds off their treatment.

Two-year-old Zak, from Hull, had a surprise visit from the Giggle Doctors following a procedure to treat his digestion problems. Zak was mesmerised by the bubbles and bright colours that Dr Princezz brought to his bedside. But we need your help to keep bringing the Giggle Doctors to our wards. 

Make it Better appeal

Make it Better appeal

We are making Sheffield Children's Hospital even better! We need your help to bring the facilities at our hospital up to scratch by matching the world-leading care with world-class facilities. Our Make it Better appeal is our biggest campaign to date, and will see our hospital revamped with spacious wards and departments, plenty of private ensuite rooms for families to stay together and a secure outdoor space for respite and reflection. There will even by a giant play tower to take young minds off the less fun side of hospital. The new wing has been designed with our children in mind, but we still urgently need donations to make it a reality.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

In Sheffield we have the largest number of children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, or Brittle Bone Disease, in Western Europe. Through a study funded last year by the Children’s Hospital Charity, we have identified a number of candidate genes which may potentially cause bone fragility in patients. We’re now working in collaboration with the University of Sheffield to understand how these genes function. Once we know more about the role these genes play, we can take steps towards reversing their disease-causing mechanisms at a cellular level.

We are pledging £26,954 so that scientists from Sanofi Genzyme Rare Bone Disease Research can compare cells from children with fragile bones to those with healthy bones. This will help us understand exactly what happens in these patients and how we may be able to use small molecules to reverse the process and develop target treatments in the future.

Ahmad Ismail has Brittle Bone Disease and he visits Sheffield Children's Hospital for treatment. 

Respiratory rates

Respiratory rates

We are funding a research project which investigates the variation in the measurement of respiratory rate in children. How reliable are respiratory rate measurements in children?

Breathing rate is measured by both nurses and doctors when a child is admitted to hospital and gives a good indication of whether immediate care is needed. Whilst devices are available to monitor temperature, pulse rate and blood oxygen, breathing rate has to be manually counted, which leaves room for human error. This funding will allow us to explore the various methods through which healthcare professionals monitor breathing rate and whether these differences impact on the assessment of the child and their care.

Non-invasive SST testing research

Non-invasive SST testing research

We are funding a research project which aims to produce a non-invasive alternative to the Short Synacthen Test (SST) using a nasal spray and saliva collection. This would allow us to establish normal ranges for the SST in children and determine which asthmatic children are at risk.

Inhaled steroids can be used to treat asthma, but there is concern about the effect they can have on the body’s ability to produce the stress hormone, cortisol. Insufficient cortisol production in times of stress, such as surgery, can cause serious illness or even death. Patients receiving long-term steroid treatment may have reduced levels of cortisol, known as adrenal suppression, a complication which is particularly serious for children. Healthcare professionals can use a Short Synacthen Test  to investigate the ability of the body’s adrenal glands to produce cortisol. Presently the SST test involves injecting Synacthen into a vein and then requires blood samples which are invasive, time consuming and may be unpleasant for the patient.

Research

Research

We fund pioneering research to make it better

As part of The Children’s Hospital Charity’s mission to make it better, we fund vital research which the NHS does not cover – helping to provide the very best healthcare for children.

With the help of charitable donations we were able to open a brand new Clinical Research Facility – the first of its kind in the UK. The facility is key to bringing together doctors, nurses, students and other health professionals together to develop pioneering work in a range of areas such as bone disease, genetics and cancer.

We have committed to fund over £250,000 research every year to ensure future generations receive the very best health care – through better treatment, better diagnosis and better treatment.

Investigating food allergies

Investigating food allergies

We are funding a research project which explores whether using a skin cream every day from near birth to up to one year of age can reduce the risk of eczema in infants with a family history of allergic conditions. 

This study involves 641 infants using the cream who will then be compared to 641 other new-borns whose parents have not been advised to use it. The effects on the children will be observed within their home environment by a research nurse when they reach two years of age.

This money will fund a new assessment for participants in the ongoing BEEP trial study which will investigate whether these skin creams can reduce the risk of food allergies which can be extremely troublesome and even fatal. This study will examine whether food allergies can be caused by eczema in the early months of life and whether or not skin creams can prevent food allergies in the long term.

Burns Club

Burns Club

Theo’s Burns Club was set up through our charity to help youngsters treated on the Burns Unit at Sheffield Children's Hospital. As well as funding equipment such as a thermally controlled bath and pain distraction units, donations made to the club help pay for days out and camps for children coming to terms with their injuries. Julie Baker, ward manager, said: “It is to get families supporting each other. We all go over together and then we introduce different families to each other – to someone who knows what they are going through, because no one else can know. We get them to talk through all of their experiences, and it helps them deal with the emotions surrounding the burns.”

Fighting neuroblastoma

Fighting neuroblastoma

Neuroblastoma is a type of children’s cancer whish arises in specialised nerve cells within the nervous system and other tissues. They are one of the most common solid tumours seen in children and account for approximately 5% of cancers in this age group. 

Treatment involves intensive chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, all of which cause a great deal of discomfort. Unfortunately a significant proportion of children who are diagnosed with neuroblastoma have a poor prognosis. Approximately one child with neuroblastoma dies in Sheffield Children’s hospital each year. There is therefore an urgent need to develop new drugs to improve the outcome for children with neuroblastoma.

Recently, we discovered a new type of drug which has been approved for women with ovarian cancer. Evidence gathered in our laboratory suggests that this drug may be effective in neuroblastoma. This money will help us investigate further its potential to make treatment less toxic and improve survival rates.

Equipment

Equipment

Every year we fund life-saving equipment to keep Sheffield Children's Hospital at the forefront of paediatric care. Thanks to the generosity of our supporters we can keep our hospital’s specialist services special, by providing equipment that goes over and above the NHS provision. Over the years, The Children’s Hospital Charity has donated millions of pounds worth of ground-breaking medical kit and machinery to ensure every child we treat receives the best possible care. But we will never stop wanting better for our children, so we will never stop needing your help.

Room sponsorship

Room sponsorship

As part of The Children’s Hospital Charity’s Make it Better appeal we need to transform our hospital with world class facilities to match the existing world class care. Your support can make that a reality.

By sponsoring a room, you are helping our patients get better in an environment designed with them in mind. With your support, we can fit our consultation room with additions that go above and beyond the standard NHS provision, including enhanced glazing, parent facilities, lighting and equipment.We know the importance of making the clinical more comfortable, and with your help we can achieve it.

To find out more email Tchad Western our corporate fundraisers.

Analysing telescopic rods

Analysing telescopic rods

Telescopic rods are inserted into the bones of patients suffering from Osteogenesis Imperfecta to treat fractures and deformity. These rods grow as the bones of the child grow, avoiding the need for frequent re-operations. However, these devices currently have a high failure rate and re-operations are needed in up to 50% of cases. 

We are funding a research project which analysis's the failed rods once they have been removed. This study aims to help support the design of a new and improved Sheffield Rod, with a far lower failure rate.

Play specialists

Play specialists

At Sheffield Children's Hospital, a team of play specialists work hard to help make hospital stays that bit easier for our young patients. 

They work to provide entertainment, fun and distraction for children of all ages - taking their minds of painful treatments and breaking up long stays on the wards.

Our charity helps make their job easier, by funding craft materials, toys and games to ensure our children can play and take part in activities while in hospital. Each year, we need to raise £5000 to donate to the team so they can continue doing their amazing work.

Cystic Fibrosis Unit

Cystic Fibrosis Unit

Artfelt are working with designers Thomas.Matthews, who delivered a successful project (pictured) in our new Theatres Department last year. They will be providing colourful artwork for the waiting room and consulting rooms in our Cystic Fibrosis Unit. The artwork will provide much needed interest and distraction for patients visiting the clinic.

Garden spaces

Garden spaces

In 2016/17 we need to raise £300,000 to create secure garden spaces in the new wing of our hospital. We have already raised £100,000 but we still need to raise more to bring the outdoors to the new wing of our hospital. 

This means our children and their families will have somewhere to play outside and get some fresh air, in what is often a difficult time.

Play Tower

Play Tower

Christmas 2016 we all went a bit elfy to fund a giant Play Tower in the new outpatients department of the hospital. This will be a child-friendly space where patients can go for distraction and fun, away from their hospital wards.

When children come in to hospital for a planned appointment or for a procedure they can often be quite anxious. The Play Tower will give them something exciting and adventurous to spot and be a place where they can play and have fun.

Every donation given to the Christmas fund, up to a total value of £100,000, was also matched by Graham Royle of GRI Group, meaning that each contribution will be instantly doubled.

Graham Royle, CEO of GRI Group said, “The Children's Hospital Charity is renowned for funding highly specialised technology for improving patients' treatment but less well known for its hugely important investments in patients' wellbeing. It is believed that relieving stress aids recovery, so this new play tower has massive medical benefits, as well as providing the children with lots of fun.”

Designed by Avanti Architects, the one-of-a-kind tower covers multiple floors and is covered in brightly coloured windows and furnishing – making visiting hospital an adventure for patients.