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DXA Scanner

When 12-year-old Ahmad from Derby was born, his parents – and his GP – didn’t know why he was always crying in discomfort. When he started getting unexplained injuries, like broken bones and fractures, his doctor referred him to Sheffield Children's Hospital where he was diagnosed with osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease.

Our metabolic bone team are world leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of brittle bones and thanks to £75,000 in donations The Children’s Hospital Charity were able to fund a DXA bone density scanner to keep our hospital at the forefront of medical provision for this illness. The scanner is sensitive enough to scan babies, providing accurate diagnosis from birth that can have a dramatic effect on health outcomes for children with brittle bones.

Gene Sequencer

Gene Sequencer

A £500,000 ‘GeneMachine’ system used to diagnose patients with rare and inherited diseases was funded thanks to generous donations to The Children’s Hospital Charity. The Next Generation Sequencers are two of just 15 at NHS trusts, and are able to screen 100 genes at once for mutations – meaning tests for suspected genetic disorders can now be returned within two weeks instead of a year. Dr Ann Dalton, consultant clinical director of Genetics at Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, said: “The machine has revolutionised genetic science for our patients. The first stage for us is to cut waiting times for test results. Before we could only test one gene at a time but now we can test up to 100 together.

"This will mean a lot to some of our patients waiting on a confirmed diagnosis or changes in treatment.

”What makes us unique from the majority of the other facilities in the country is that we have an excellent system built around the sequencer, including robotic machines."

The new technology is based in the laboratories at Sheffield Children's Hospital and can test DNA from any living organism.

Brain Lab

Brain Lab

Thanks to charity patron, Michael Vaughan, who raised an incredible £215,000 with a China trek in 2012, we were able to fund ground-breaking surgical equipment for the theatre department at Sheffield Children's Hospital. The brain lab allows our surgeons to see a unique, 3D, real-time map of the area they are operating on – making our hospital one of the most advanced centres for children’s brain tumour removal and complex brain surgery.

Mr Hesham Zaki, consultant neurosurgeon at Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, said: “It’s like a GPS system for the brain. We can use it to identify the best, most accurate route to a tumour and we can make smaller incisions because of this.

“For the patients themselves, and their families, it means a faster recovery time, a shorter stay in hospital and better outcomes. For neurosurgery in Sheffield, this means we’re one of the most advanced centres for children’s brain tumour removal and complex brain surgery.”

Hydrotherapy Pool

Hydrotherapy Pool

Georgia likes dancing, and socialising – doing all the things that 13-year-olds like to do.

But a condition called juvenile idiopathic arthritis means she her joints often ache and leave her in pain.

Thanks to regular swimming sessions at The Children’s Hospital’s hydrotherapy pool, funded through charity donations, Georgia can build her strength and keep active, without putting too much pressure on her joints.

The pool, at Ryegate House in Sheffield, provides a vital rehabilitation tool and sensory experience for many children seen by the therapy team and is used in the treatment of children with many different needs.

Oliver Ward, physiotherapist at Sheffield Children's Hospital, said: “We find that our patients are able to exercise more rigorously in the pool than on land, which helps them to avoid secondary problems such as weight gain, weakness and loss of cardiovascular fitness which can act as a risk for future arthritis flares.”

Melmark Ultrasound

Melmark Ultrasound

The Children’s Hospital in Sheffield – a Centre of Excellence for the treatment of problems with muscles and bones – helps children like Cavan take their first steps.

The youngster, 7, from Northampton, has hemimelia, meaning he is missing bones in his arms and legs. He was just one when doctors said he may need to have all four limbs amputated.

But thanks to the care of specialists including consultant orthopaedic surgeon Mr James Fernandes – who created a plan of treatment for each of Cavan's limbs - Cavan is one step closer to walking unaided.

The Children’s Hospital Charity helps keep our specialist services special. We funded five Melmak Ultrasound machines, to help speed up the bone healing process for children like Cavan. The small hand-held device can be used at home by the patient, delivering a low intensity pulse which improves circulation around the area and helps form new bone.

OI Research

OI Research

A research project funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity has uncovered a new way to diagnose children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or brittle bone disease. Dr Meena Balasubramanian, consultant clinical geneticist at Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, carried out detailed clinical exams, X-rays, skin biopsies and genetic testing on 15 children and was able to identify a genetic cause of the condition in eight of those. One, Henry Batterby from Ashbourne, now has an answer for why he has brittle bones. His mum, Jess, said: “Before the research was offered to us we were uncertain about why Henry had OI. Most people with the condition inherit it from a family member. Since we took part in the study we have found the gene that is affected in Henrys particular case was spontaneous, not inherited. I believe knowledge is power when it comes to OI, so anything that helps us understand it so we can make life with it easier is a good thing.”

Parent Rooms

Parent Rooms

Staying in hospital can often be a stressful and anxious time for families. By offering parents a calm and comforting space to relax away from the ward, we can help them support their child during their time in the hospital.

We recently refurbished the parent rooms on two wards, providing parents and siblings with comfortable lounge areas where they can enjoy refreshments, read and recuperate in a calm and quiet space. The rooms are sometimes used to discuss difficult news with our parents, so the space also needed to be serene.

With your donations, we funded new flooring, seating, paintwork and art for two of our busiest patient rooms. We introduced colour into the space, using photographs by Stephen Elliott. Stephen captures scenes of the spectacular Peak District, which are welcoming and familiar to our families without being intrusive.

CT Scanner

CT Scanner

Benji was diagnosed with leukaemia just a month after his third birthday. At our hospital, a Principal Treatment Centre for children with cancer and leukaemia, children like Benji have the best chance of an early diagnosis, meaning they have the best chance to beat the disease. With the help of BBC Radio Sheffield and its listeners, The Children’s Hospital Charity funded a £500,000 64 slice CT scanner, to aid radiologists in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of illnesses, including leukaemia. Far faster than the scanner we had previously, it also emits lower doses of radiation. Benji is now in remission, but will stay on a low dose of chemotherapy for the next three years to make sure all of the cancer is gone.

Asthma Research

Asthma Research

Patients with a variety of conditions including asthma, arthritis and cancer who use steroid treatments will benefit from research funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity. Dr Charlotte Elder has found a non-invasive test for adrenal suppression, caused when steroids inhibit the body’s ability to naturally produce the steroid hormone cortisol. During times of illness and stress it can be fatal. She can now test why adrenal suppression occurs in youngsters, meaning children like Harvey, who use inhalers, receive the best possible treatment. Our charity funds £250,000 of research each year into the prevention and cure of childhood illnesses.

Action Lab

Action Lab

We funded the Action Lab at The Children’s Hospital in Sheffield – the only dedicated laboratory in our region for testing children’s lung functions. The team sees all kinds of respiratory patients including children with cystic fibrosis.

The lab has exercise testing equipment, including a treadmill with software that makes the lab even more effective in the diagnosis and treatment of cardio-respiratory problems such as exercise-induced asthma. Our team can now offer the most advanced exercise test, allowing them to test each breath a patient takes during exercise.

We also funded a body plethysmograph, a special cubicle which measures the air a child breathes, airway resistance and changes in air pressure. 

Baby Patient Simulator

Baby Patient Simulator

We funded a high-level patient simulator baby mannequin which drives mechanical and computer software allowing sophisticated modelling of cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

Used by our critical care and Embrace teams to run specialist training, the program increases the opportunities for clinical staff to practice responses to various crisis scenarios.

This equipment enables innovative and extremely valuable training to be provided virtually anywhere. Trainers can then use the comprehensive video and monitoring data that is captured, to show those being trained any improvements that need to be made.

Research into Breatheasy use

Research into Breatheasy use

An exciting project to test the world’s first device for measuring respiratory rate has been funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity. Led by Dr Heather Elphick, the study will test the applicability of the ‘Breatheasy’ device, a handheld machine that has been created to avoid the need for manually checking a child’s breathing.

It is hard to measure breathing consistently, and this machine will provide a consistent way of doing so.

During the research, the device will be used in clinical and non-clinical settings to evaluate its performance on children and adults in nurseries, schools, universities, hospital emergency departments, general practice surgeries and ambulances.

The device will be of particular use in emergency departments, where nursing staff will easily be able to measure each child’s respiratory rate so that the most seriously ill children will be identified.

3T MRI Scanner

3T MRI Scanner

The Intraoperative 3 Tesla MRI is an advanced technology imaging device. It can be used to produce images of the entire body and its rapid imaging during brain surgery assists the surgeon by providing them with more detailed information.

The 3T is part of a theatres redevelopment that makes the intraoperative suite one of the most advanced operating environments in the country, if not the world. 

Hesham Zaki, Paediatric Neurosurgeon at Sheffield Children's Hospital, said: “This is a massive step forward. Our new intraoperative 3T MRI theatre is full of innovations including the most up to date neuronavigation equipment and will allow us to lead on the best outcomes for children’s brain tumours both in the UK and worldwide. Completely removing tumours which were previously inoperable is now a more realistic option.”

Digital X-Ray

Digital X-Ray

We raised £250,000 to fund a new digital X-ray suite that allows images to be ready in just four seconds.

This new technology means that more than 20,000 children a year will benefit from faster and easier X-rays. Instead of moving a hurt patient into position for the X-rays, our radiologists can now move around them. The suite uses lower doses of radiation, making it safer, and the high resolution images mean the x-rays are even more accurate.

Research into education around adolescent testicular health

Research into education around adolescent testicular health

A study to develop an effective educational tool for adolescent testicular health has been funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity.

There are currently no routine educational services for children and young men highlighting the urgency of a painful or swollen scrotum, even though 1 in 4000 adolescent males experience torsion of the testes each year. Surgical detorsion can save a testes if done in a timely fashion, with irreversible damaged being noted in the testes from six hours of twist.

The research will identify common themes and steer the development of appropriate empowering educational resources to prevent needless testicular loss.

Enhancing expertise in trainee radiologists

Enhancing expertise in trainee radiologists

A study to enhance the training experience of radiologists has been carried out by Dr Amaka Offiah and funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity.

Dr Offiah developed a bank of radiographs to study the ways in which trainees progress their expertise. She found that experts take longer to interpret images than trainees – contrary to existing findings. The study suggests possible reasons for this, including experts attempting to exclude complications, while juniors don’t look for another abnormality once one is found.

The findings will be used to shape trainee programmes and further funding is being sought to further the work.

Breast Pumps

Breast Pumps

Premature babies can get the potentially life-saving benefits of their mothers’ breast milk, thanks to new machines funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity. Four specialist electric breast pumps, designed for mothers of pre-term babies, were donated to Sheffield Children's Hospital thanks to fundraising through our charity. Breast milk is especially important for these babies, whose intestines are often not fully developed and who are prone to infection in their gut. They need the antibodies in the milk to fight off infection.The neonatal department still needs one more pump, costing £1750. Can you help make it better for our tiniest patients?

Embrace

Embrace

The Children's Hospital Charity has a long history of fundraising for improvements to critical care services and fundraises for Embrace – Yorkshire and the Humber’s dedicated infant transport team.

In 1993, the charity donated the first mobile intensive care ambulance, Bear 1. A second appeal for Bear 2 followed, and the £120,000 needed was raised in just three weeks.

When Embrace was set up in 2009 Bear 2 was their first ambulance and since then, the charity has continued to help keep the service at the forefront of paediatric care.

In 2014, the charity funded a portable cerebral function monitoring machine for use in transit to help newborn babies with suspected seizures or who may have been deprived of oxygen at birth. This helps prevent cerebral palsy and reduce brain injury, and allows critical care clinicians to start treatment before the child arrives at hospital.

Other things the charity has funded for Embrace include improvements to incubators and snack packs and portable chargers for parents on journeys.

Using thermal imaging for paediatric diagnosis and monitoring

Using thermal imaging for paediatric diagnosis and monitoring

Using thermal imaging, a technique widely used in industry to find defects in machines, clinicians may be able to help diagnoses children who are ill or injured, without unnecessary delays or radiation.

A study led by Dr Shammi Ramlakhan and funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity is underway to determine the accuracy of thermal imaging for diagnosis in neonatal patients, children with wrist injury, children with limps, children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, children under investigation for non-accidental injury and children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

Clinical Research Facility

Clinical Research Facility

The charity has a long and proud history of funding research at Sheffield Children’s Hospital. 

Over twelve months in 2007, the charity raised a huge £400,000 as a contribution towards building a brand new Clinical Research Facility at the Western Bank hospital. The first of its kind for children in the UK, the facility provides dedicated research space to further child-centred research within Sheffield Children's NHS Foundation Trust.

The facility is key to bringing together doctors, students, nurses and other health professionals who are exploring the vast potential of medical research and helping forge the way in paediatric care.

Physiotherapy equipment

Physiotherapy equipment

Active challenges ran, walked, cycled and swam their way to funding physiotherapy equipment for two new Therapy Rooms in the new wing of the hospital. The rooms are located on the Surgical and Medical Floor and will treat specialities such as Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Medicine, Neurology, Oncology, Burns & Plastics, Orthopaedics, PLRS, Rheumatology and Metabolic Bone Disease.

Physiotherapy & occupational therapy previously took place at patient’s bed side, as well as in public spaces such as the corridor and stairs, therefore creating a private rehabilitation space will help to make it more fun, as well as maximise the potential for our patients to reach their goals more easily. 

Newborn screening

Newborn screening

Each year, we fund up to £250,000 of research into the prevention and cure of childhood illnesses and disease. One of these projects was a pioneering screening programme which detects rare life-threatening diseases in babies.

Thanks to a successful pilot study led by Sheffield Children's Hospital, all newborn babies in England will be screened for four additional rare but serious conditions. Testing for these conditions, leading to early detection and treatment, is potentially life-saving and gives children the best chance of a happy and healthy life.

Professor Jim Bonham, national lead for the project and director for newborn screening at Sheffield Children's NHS Foundation Trust, said: "As a result of this study, we have been able to make an enormous difference to children and their families, in some cases giving them the gift of life."

Fluoroscopy

Fluoroscopy

A life-saving machine designed to quickly spot blockages to blood flow was funded by the charity following the staggering success of the Herd of Sheffield and patron Dan Walker’s golf day.

The fluoroscopy system allows our radiology department to see moving X-rays, providing rapid diagnosis when every second counts. Vascular trauma can lead to serious blood loss and disruption to parts of the body, and the time from diagnosis to treatment is critical. Loss of blood supply can cause tissue to die, meaning a child could lose their limb. In some cases it is the difference between life and death.

A continuous X-ray beam is passed through the body part being examined and the beam is transmitted onto a monitor, enabling surgical intervention with minimal scarring and without the child needing to go to theatre. It is the current gold standard for treating vascular trauma and means our patients no longer need to be transferred by air ambulance to Leeds. By funding the best equipment available, our radiologists can now treat patients here at Sheffield Children’s Hospital.

The multipurpose system can also aid diagnosis for areas including gastroenterology, urinary and bladder pressure, orthopaedics, replacement of complex feeding tubes, and emergency surgery.  

Narcolepsy Day

Narcolepsy Day

A condition that causes young sufferers to fall asleep spontaneously, often dozens of times throughout the day, was explored at a dedicated event funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity.

Narcolepsy is a rare neurological disorder that affects children from around age six, and lasts into adulthood. Children known to have this condition in the region were invited to attend the first Narcolepsy Day on September 19th 2015.

Professor Heather Elphick, consultant in paediatric sleep medicine at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, who organised the day, said: “Some children may fall asleep just two or three times in the day, but have sleeps lasting hours on end that they are very difficult to rouse from. Others may fall asleep dozens of times a day for just a few seconds at a time. They have to be careful when crossing roads, as they may fall asleep while walking, they need to be careful at heights, when around stairs and they may never be able to drive. The sleep clinic exists to control the symptoms of narcolepsy, so the children can go on to live their lives and be independent.”

The first Narcolepsy day brought together 40 guests from 12 families across the region to help learn about the condition and introduce support networks. The event, The Chimney House in Sheffield featured speakers including Dr Michael Farquhar, consultant in paediatric sleep medicine at Evelina hospital in London and psychologist Rebecca Martyn. The children, aged 8 – 16, had an opportunity to meet each other, hear specialist advice on their condition and learn about transitioning into adult care. 

Brittle bones research

Brittle bones research

The Children’s Hospital Charity has just approved funding for further study into the diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bones, by Dr Meena Balasumbramanian.

The study seeked to use exome sequencing technology, available at Sheffield Children's Hospital, to test all the human genes in a group of children who test negative using current OI testing methods to establish the genetic cause of their bone disease. This will provide better understanding of the genetic origins of bone disease and will allow clinicians to better provide for patients based on that information. In the long term, it will help treat researched understand how the disease affects bone formation, allowing more effective treatments to be discovered.

Children come from all over the UK for genetic testing for OI here in Sheffield. Scott, from Milton Keynes, has been coming here for treatment for eight years. Thanks to research like this, Scott and other children with OI can get the help they need.

Research into anaesthesia safety

Research into anaesthesia safety

A charity-funded study into best practice when anaesthetising children has uncovered new findings to help ensure a smooth recovery after an anaesthetic.

In research led by Dr Judith Short, consultant in paediatric anaesthesia at Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, a trial to see the safest way to remove a laryngeal mask airway after anaesthesia found that fewer complications occur if the child is lying on their side when it is removed.

Dr Short, said: “To administer anaesthesia both in adults and children, the laryngeal mask is often used. At the end of the anaesthetic, the mask is removed before the patient becomes aware of it. During the removal and immediately after removal, it is possible for complications to occur, such as coughing, vomiting, obstruction of the air passage, closure of vocal cords, and reduction of the oxygen in the blood.”

Previous research has found that removing the mask while the patient is deeply anaesthetised or just before waking leads to the fewest complications. But studies report that the various complications can affect between 2.4 per cent and 35 per cent of patients.

Dr Short’s study, funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity as part of its annual commitment to funding research, involved a trial on 216 patients. They were allocated into four groups for different instructions regarding the removal of the laryngeal mask; either on the back or side and either just before wakefulness or while deeply anaesthetised. Records were kept of any airway complications in the first 15 minutes, and the complications were graded based on their seriousness.

Dr Short added: “There was a significant difference between the overall rate of complications in the four groups, with the lowest rate of complications occurring in the group whose masks were removed with them deeply anaesthetised and on their sides and the lowest seriousness score occurring in the group whose masks were removed just before full wakefulness on their side. We were therefore able to recommend that there is an advantage to placing children on their side for removal of a laryngeal mask and recovery after anaesthesia. We now have a local guideline regarding the removal and hope the report of our study will influence patient safety to a wider degree.”

The findings have been published in the European Journal of Anaesthesiology.

The Children’s Hospital Charity funds up to £250,000 of research each year into the prevention and cure of childhood illness and disease. 

Juvenile arthritis research

Juvenile arthritis research

A research study to develop a computerised tool to aid the detection of joint inflammation in children with suspected juvenile idiopathic arthritis has been funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity.

The study, by Dr Daniel Hawley, will help develop computer models for 3D analysis of the gait movements of healthy children, which may be useful in detecting subtle joint changes resulting in altered movement during examination.

It will mean children like Georgia, 13, who suffer with juvenile arthritis, have a better chance of an early diagnosis and can get the help they need faster.

Rare metabolic diseases research

Rare metabolic diseases research

Improving diagnosis of children with inherited metabolic diseases is the aim of a study currently being funded by The Children’s Hospital Charity. Inherited metabolic diseases are a group of individually rare but collectively common conditions that affect the metabolism. They can be severe or even fatal, so making diagnosis as easy as possible is important.

Dr Richard Kirk is leading the investigation, which will use exome sequencing to look at ten children who currently don’t have a diagnosis. The study will see the genes of these children analysed, and will then drag on available clinical and biochemical information with the aim of getting a definitive diagnosis.

The study hopes to show that the equipment and expertise available at Sheffield needs to be rolled out as standard across the NHS, and will pave the way for a national study.

Gym Equipment for Cystic Fibrosis patients

Gym Equipment for Cystic Fibrosis patients

New exercise equipment was funded for Cystic Fibrosis patients. The new pieces of equipment will be used in the specially designed Cystic Fibrosis gym as well as transferable to patient’s rooms. This is because exercise and availability of exercise equipment for CF patients whilst they are an inpatient helps with their treatment. Some patients are limited to staying in their room and therefore cannot access the gym, whereas now the equipment can be taken to their room to help them exercise while they are staying at our hospital.

Defibrillators

Defibrillators

All eight of the hospital’s defibrillators were replaced in 2017 to provide staff with the latest equipment across all areas of the hospital.

Defibrillation is the delivery of lifesaving electrical energy to the heart during an abnormal rhythm or very rapid erratic beating of the heart.The new defibrillators will provide the emergency clinicians with real-time feedback on their chest compressions which is clinically proven to increase the quality of CPR and could potentially improve the chances of saving the patient’s life.

New hospital Wing

New hospital Wing

We are building a new wing to our special hospital and construction is well on the way to making Sheffield Children's Hospital better. The project is vital to the future of our hospital. Lots of wards were built in the 1960's, the hospital is becoming increasingly cramped and there is limited outdoor space. 

Our Make it Better Appeal aims to match world class facilities with the existing world class care, creating the best possible environment for children to get better more quickly. We have already funded enhancements to the project such as bedroom entertainment systems, furniture, parent beds, en-suit facilities, hoist plus much more but there is still a long way to go. 

  

Artfelt workshops

Artfelt workshops

Artfelt helps to make hospital feel better by engaging patients in fun and creative workshops, whether they are staying at Sheffield Children’s Hospital long term, or just for a few hours.

From mosaics and bunting to animation and cardboard robots, Workshop Co-ordinator Laura uses visual arts and crafts to get children socialising, expressing and enjoying themselves – a valuable way to distract patients from their treatment so they can get better more quickly.

Theatres

Theatres

Works by designers Thomas.Matthews line the theatres corridors to provide distraction for children during the anxious moments before they are anaesthetised. The focus of the work was to create something that would not only complement the state-of-the-art new theatres suites, but would bring cohesion to the old and new parts of the department. 

Patients range from aged 0 to16 years, therefore the scheme acts on multiple levels, providing tools for improvisation and dialogue, but without being patronising to older patients. The art culminates with a focal light boxes in the ceiling of each new anaesthetic room and a colourful mobile on route to the new 3T MRI scanner.

Eye Department

Eye Department

Artfelt worked with designer Nick Deakin to create visually stimulating artwork across the Eye Department and provided new furniture, flooring and paint scheme. Nick used bold colours and a simplistic style to create a world of characters running through the department. The project is designed to both engage and stimulate young patients, whilst its placement assists in clinical assessment.

Sleep workshops

Sleep workshops

We regularly fund sleep workshops and sleep studies at The Children's Hospital, enabling sleep-deprived youngsters and their parents to get a good night's rest.

One youngster who recently took part in a sleep workshop was Libby, 19 months, and her mum Jenny. Jenny, a working parent, didn't know where to turn after Libby began waking to play for up to three hours every night.

Jenny said: "I left the workshop feeling more positive than I had in months. It was amazing to speak to other families who knew exactly what we were going through, who understood how broken sleep can affect every part of your life. We weren’t alone! The trainers were fantastic, empathetic, knowledgeable and they’d been through it too – they knew! We put a lot of things I’d learnt that day into practice and things did improve."

Child Assessment Unit

Child Assessment Unit

The Child Assessment Unit at Sheffield Children’s Hospital provides a full paediatric assessment for children and young people where safeguarding concerns have been raised or where the opinion of a specialist paediatrician has been sought. Their Forensic Waiting Room needed updating to provide more pleasant surroundings for the typically older children. Artfelt added graphic vinyls and adolescent friendly artwork to create a comfortable, but contemporary space.

Pharmacy Corridor

Pharmacy Corridor

Inaluxe is an independent art studio combining the talents of fine artists Kristina Sostarko and Jason Odd. Framed prints of their feathered friends create a more tranquil space.

Stairwell

Stairwell

Artfelt worked with the Facilities on refreshing the busy stairwell which runs up to Ward S3. The team replaced the tired paint work and flooring, whilst Artfelt commissioned a colourful procession of animals from local designer Mick Marsden, 

Creating a hospital with children in mind means many of the spaces, such as a stairwell, are just as important as a treatment room. Moving around the hospital can sometimes be a challenge, creating a bright and friendly route will help create distraction as well as being uplifting, making the clinical more friendly. 

Bedrooms

Bedrooms

Working with acclaimed designer Morag Myerscough, we devised four colourways - from bright to calm - across all 46 en suite bedrooms and a different scheme for the multi occupancy bays in the hospital's newest wing.

This project was 2 years in the making and involved some technical challenges - using standard hospital materials in a new way - but we believe the rooms make a real difference to the experience of being in hospital.

“Although the rooms are for children I didn’t want them to be childish because children of all different age groups will be staying in them,” said Morag. “I also wanted to create somewhere parents would be happy to spend time too. It was just about making a bedroom that you felt good to be in.”

The project is part of numerous fresh commissions we're providing for the hospital's biggest ever re-development

Photos: Jill Tate

Nelson the prosthetic eye

Nelson the prosthetic eye

Nelson is a silicon eye model which is used to help teach patients and families insert and remove lenses and prosthesis, as well as explaining procedures including taking an impression of the eye. It helps train the parents or carers who may have to insert contact lenses for their baby or infant if they are for example born with cataracts. We fund hundreds of smaller projects like this each year, which make a major difference to the lives of our patients.

High Frequency Oscillator Ventilator

High Frequency Oscillator Ventilator

Funded solely by the Bancroft family and their community in Hathersage the new ‘High Frequency Oscillator’ ventilator is a specialist piece of equipment used to help children with breathing difficulties or whose lungs are not functioning properly. Conventional ventilators breathe for the patients at a similar rate and volume to the patient’s normal breathing whereas the new oscillator functions by giving small volumes of air and oxygen into the lungs at a high frequency, which helps to prevent the lungs from being damaged by high pressures.

Smaller children are automatically given the correct energy during resuscitation and it also provides real time feedback and monitors the rate and depth of chest compressions. This improves the quality of resuscitation which helps to improve the chances of saving a patient’s life.

Minimally invasive autopsy

Minimally invasive autopsy

We funded research that will help families at their most difficult time, by offering an effective and minimally invasive autopsy option that is as effective as conventional methods.

The research has been called the future of pathology after Dr Marta Cohen, consultant pathologist at Sheffield Children's Hospital, identified a way to carry out a post-mortem using just two insertions and an MRI..

She said: “An autopsy is a legal requirement in some cases, so families don’t have a choice. Some want answers, but others don’t like the idea of an invasive process. This makes it easier for them when their hands are tied with a decision as we can give them this option.

“Unlike in areas like genealogy where there has been an explosion of techniques and development, pathology has remained static. The autopsy is the same now as it was 100 years ago. Minimally invasive autopsy is the big step that pathology has needed.”

The new procedure involves just one insertion into the chest, called a thoracoscopy to take samples and a laparoscopy into the stomach. An MRI is also carried out. The research, carried out by Dr Cohen alongside Dr Sethuraman, Dr Elspeth Whitby, Mr Sean Marven and Mr Richard Lindley, involved carrying out a minimally invasive autopsy and a conventional autopsy and comparing the findings. It was found to be as effective, and can be used in two thirds of cases where autopsy is required.